Maturation – Pre-Conception to 21 Years of Age

Molestation, Abuse, and Shame

A Cure Through Self-Therapy

Shame as a noun is an emotion, a feeling, or a thing; as a verb, it is an act of giving or receiving. Shame is also a multidimensional energy that can be passed from perpetrator to victim. Once the victim becomes infected shame builds until the victim is compelled to pass that shame to another person who then becomes a victim who eventually has to pass the infecting virus of shame on to another person.

There are two types of shame, the type that is given to one by another and that which is self-created. Molestation and abuse victims are always filled with the perpetrators’ shame. Once the victim is imbued with shame, she does not possess that shame, she becomes that shame and therefore she is the best person to learn to remove shame and to become her own empowered healer.

This is not a victim/therapist venture; it is a self-help skill that any victim can master. Victims spend countless hours looking for relief from the consequences of their molestation and abuse. Their constant search for relief from their trauma(s) develops within them the multidimensional skills needed to move in and out of time and space. When victims make these choices, they become seekers.

A self-therapeutic session consists of meditation, visualization, and focus, skills victims without conscious knowledge usually develop as a byproduct of their abuse. Abuse opens channels into the victims’ psyche which are often misunderstood because they may evoke feelings from past lives which get confused with present-life traumas. Women are usually better at these skills because they are more aware of their body sensations, feelings, and thoughts than their male counterparts, but the damage shame causes has little to do with the victim’s gender.

The self-therapeutic intent is to travel back in time to the place or space where the molestation took place, to interrupt the abuse by finding the child-she-was-then, subdue the perpetrator, and have the child remove the shame. The victim returns the shame to the perpetrator. Niceness, politeness, or cordialities are not options. When this is accomplished, the seeker becomes the healer.

This self-healing path takes time, but to the victim, time is endless without healing and healing cannot be done in the present time; it must take place in the time and space where the trauma took place. Healing is progressive; it morphs to advantageous probabilities bringing them more in focus so the now healer usually finds herself on a different path altogether and that path is a step toward her now life’s purpose.

This is the science of soul, putting soul back into psychology knowing that only the victim who suffers the wounds can heal them.

The outcome has nothing to do with hope, prayer, or desire. It has to do with action. Action is required to find shame and it takes action to heal shame. Life after that is one’s own.